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seeks information that will lead to the genesis of unrelated southeast Missouri family history narratives that include a Franklin D. Roosevelt era covert unidentified crash retrieval, an alleged UFO.
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SEEKING MO INFO: 1941 SOUTHEAST MISSOURI UNIDENTIFIED CRASH RETRIEVAL
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According to the source, a widow of an associate of the Missouri Institute of Aeronautics (MIA), after the 1941 retrieval event a man associated with the MIA claimed to have covertly transported victims of an unidentified crash. The description of the victims as “little people,” as well as the inability to identify the unknown craft, caused the man and other residents to believe a spaceship had crashed in the southeast Missouri countryside. Many other town residents claimed at the time that the man was just mentally confused.

An unrelated research source claimed a thorough knowledge of the institute. The first response to a query was an adamant denial of any unusual crashes at the Missouri Institute of Aeronautics. Then as an afterthought, the individual stated that somewhat recently a previous MIA associate had occasion to speak to the source about the institute. “There is a man—somewhat confused at times—who said he ‘picked up the bodies’ of crash victims from the base [MIA]. He continued to comment that there were more crashes than had been reported.”
Circa 1941 Family History Narratives

Reports of a southeast Missouri unidentified crash surfaced when Charlette Mann sent a May 6, 1991, letter to UFO researcher Raymond Fowler. Mr. Fowler forwarded a copy of Ms. Mann’s letter to fellow researcher Leonard Stringfield,  who included Ms. Mann’s account in his publication “UFO Crash/Retrievals: The Inner Sanctum, Status Report VI.”
 
According to the Mann  letter, Charlette Mann's grandfather, Reverend William Huffman, was a Cape Girardeau Baptist minister. On a spring Cape Girardeau evening in 1941, the reverend received a call for assistance due to an apparent airplane accident. According to Ms. Mann, a driver of an unmarked car picked up the reverend and drove for 13–15 miles or so outside of Cape Girardeau. Upon arrival to the crash site, the reverend found evidence that something extraordinary had happened. The attending military personnel swore all to secrecy.

Research lead to additional southeast Missouri family history narratives that include a covert retrieval of an unidentified object circa 1941. One such account was a sincere young man that spoke about an event his churchgoing grandmother witnessed when she was a young girl. According to this family history account, three large boulders---the grandmother said for lack of a better word---sat on previously empty land. The largest object stood approximately six feet tall. The unknown material reflected sunlight like metal and radiated a strong stench. The objects did not appear to be pieces of any type of vehicle or craft known in that era. Men in a flatbed truck arrived at the crossroads community. A man dressed in business attire paid the Grandmother's father, a strong man of large stature, to help uniformed men load the objects onto a flatbed truck. The men in charge were concerned the objects would be too heavy to lift. Surprisingly, the material was lightweight and moved with great ease. The Grandmother recalled that when her father returned home, the robust man stood at the kitchen sink as he washed and rewashed his hands repeatedly as if to remove the stench of the encounter.

The narrator of the next family history account was the son of southeast Missouri sharecroppers. The sharecropper's son was too young to remember Missouri because his parents moved to Minnesota in 1943 to live with other family members. A puzzling Minnesota childhood memory was his parents’ frequent conversation with his aunt and uncle about being witness to an unidentified crash event while working on a southeast Missouri farm. Through the course of the rest of their lives, the sharecropper witnesses often speculated about “what it was and where it came from.”


In another account, a distinguished Sikestonian recalls talk of the incident as well. Although not a firsthand witness, the resident refers to honest and well-meaning citizens that spoke of the southeast Missouri event. After the incident, according to this source, groups of citizens gathered to patrol the area for additional signs of unidentified aerial objects.​​​
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